Arconic ALT Manufacturing Line (formerly known as Alcoa)

Bettendorf, Iowa

Markets

Industrial & Manufacturing

The Automotive Growth project started June 2012 at the west end of the facility. Two new buildings were erected to house the process equipment and waste water treatment facility as well as completely remodeling the existing buildings that currently house the CHT (Continuous Heat Treat) furnace and ATL (Automotive Treatment Line).

Tri-City performed all electrical work on the ATL system from start to finish and performed all underground duct banks, grounding, cathodic protection, substation installation and medium voltage cabling, terminations and testing for both the CHT and ATL. We worked multiple shifts and weekends to complete the project on schedule and at times had more than 70 electricians working on the various projects associated with the Automotive growth project at one time. Our manpower peaked at over 100 Tri-City Electric Co. employees supporting the electrical construction of the new project.

The ATL system receives heat treated metal from the CHT and continues the process of manufacturing the metal by applying special proprietary chemicals prior to rolling the aluminum into coils and shipping to Arconic’s customer. Tri-City Electric was instrumental in the electrical installations associated with the ATL systems. Several substations feed power to the MCCs and distribution panels that support the ATL. Cables are installed through an intricate system of cable trays. Some of the cable trays transitioned from aluminum or steel to stainless steel cable tray and conduits when near the chemical application process. All of these complex installations were performed and coordinated with other contractors and Arconic. Ryan and Associates, Seither and Cherry, GCI and Wallbridge all worked in the same areas during the same time as Tri-City Electric Co. when equipment from Andirtz, Peabody, Ebner, Rockwell and others was installed.

Once the installation was substantially complete, we assisted Rockwell, Andritz and Ebner in commissioning of the equipment. Due to the size of the system and number of motors and pumps, commissioning took several months working multiple shifts. Test coils were sent to the lab in September and final adjustments to the line were made in October and November.

In addition to the main line, there were smaller jobs associated with the line.

The #14 Slitter and Pusher furnace is also tied to the automotive growth expansion and combined, makes up over $1.25 million in sales in addition to the $4.36 million in sales associated with just the ATL. In total, Tri-City realized sales in the $13 million dollar range in 2013 for the automotive growth expansion project.

Watch video about project